Cornflake and Almond Tart

I managed to get myself, somehow, hired to make a couple of new twists on some old classic desserts. I took the opportunity to widen my baking repertoire and delve into the world of 1980s school dinner desserts. I came across a cornflake tart which I’d never heard of before. As I read the recipe, I read it and knew that it was something that would not only fit the brief I was given by a family friend but I could make in a day.

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As I read multiple recipes, and literally I must have visited 20 websites, it seemed the ratio of golden syrup to cornflakes would create a sickeningly sweet dessert, and this was understandable, but wouldn’t really suit the people I was making it for, so I found the recipe with the lowest amount of sugar and went from there.

Most of the recipes stuck to just cornflakes, golden syrup and butter, but a few had the addition of flaked almonds which I thought would be great. Not only does it add another dimension, but they look similar to the cornflakes so blended in well. Many went for raspberry jam but I stayed with the jar of strawberry in my fridge.

So here’s the recipe for my Cornflake and Almond Tart. It requires the use of a 23cm loose bottomed tart tin.

175g plain flour

75g Stork, cubed

40g caster sugar

1 egg

1 tbsp cold water

2 tbsp strawberry jam

115g golden syrup

55g Stork

25g caster sugar

A pinch of salt

130g cornflakes, unsweetened and plain

50g flaked almonds

Preheat the oven to 200°C.

Place the flour into a medium bowl and add the cubed Stork. Rub them between your fingertips until it reaches a breadcrumb consistency. Add the sugar, egg and water and using one hand, bring the pastry together into a ball.

On a floured surface, roll out the pastry until it is 5mm thick – it will become thinner when we work it in the tart tin, so don’t worry if it’s slightly thicker but do not make it thinner or it will be hard to handle.

Remove the base from your tart tin and lifting up the pastry without breaking, slip the base underneath the pastry. Fold the edges into the centre and place the base with the pastry on it back into the tin and unfold the edges.

Make sure that the pastry is tucked neatly into the edges. Take the rolling pin and roll the flutes so the pastry cuts off. Using the scraps, fill in any gaps in the base and sides. Then slightly press the pastry in the flutes so it sits proud by about 2mm around the edge.

Take a large square of foil and place into the tart tin, making sure it touches the edges. Pour in your rice, or ceramic baking beans, and spread out so it evenly covers the foil.

Filled Pastry Shell

Bake for 20 minutes. Then remove the foil and rice. Return to the oven to bake for a further 5 minutes until the base is crisp and dry to the touch. It should be slightly browned.

Blind Baking

Whilst blind baking, prepare the filling. Over a medium heat, combine the golden syrup, Stork, sugar and salt together until the sugar has dissolved, stirring continuously.

Pour in the cornflakes and the flaked almonds and mix until all the cornflakes are coated in the syrup mixture.

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Spread the jam on the base of the baked pastry shell so it creates an even but thin layer. Spoon over the cornflake mixture and use a palette knife to level out the cornflake mixture.

Return to the oven for 5 minutes just to set it slightly.

Remove from the tart tin immediately and serve with custard or cream.

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3 thoughts on “Cornflake and Almond Tart

  1. Pingback: Cornflake Streusel Cake: Revamped | Andrew in the Kitchen

  2. Pingback: ‘Rainbow’ White Chocolate Cornflake Squares | Andrew in the Kitchen

  3. Pingback: ‘Rainbow’ White Chocolate Cornflake Squares | Andrew in the Kitchen

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