Tag Archives: food

No Churn Black Sesame Ice Cream

Inspired by Nadiya Hussain’s rhubarb ripple ice cream that she made last week on her British Food Adventure, I am fuelling my obsession with black sesame and I’m sharing my recipe for my No Churn Black Sesame Ice Cream.

The black sesame ice cream has this wonderful charcoal grey colour which I think is so visually pleasing and attractive. What’s more, you certainly don’t expect the nutty, bitter and smoky flavour of black sesame to come from this grey coloured ice cream and it’s that flavour which lingers after an initial hit of creamy sweetness.

Both Nigella and Mary as well as Nadiya have also demonstrated this no churn ice cream method on their shows and it really is so simple. Instead of using a crème anglaise base for the ice cream, double cream and condensed milk remove all the hard work of making custard and using an ice cream maker.

Condensed milk contains most of the sugar you need and because it is condensed, the moisture from the milk has been evaporated giving a creamy ice cream that doesn’t contain large ice crystals which would be good for a sorbet or a granita. Whipped double cream makes the ideal ice cream texture which is light and takes away the churning process. Golden syrup, or liquid glucose, reduces the firmness of the ice cream when set and I like to add evaporated milk for a similar reason.

If you cannot find any black sesame powder, you can make it yourself very easily – and remember it is very versatile! Buy a whole load of black sesame seeds and toast them over a medium heat in a dry pan until they are fragrant and then grind them in a food processor or blender until a fine and slightly damp powder forms. Put into a zip lock bag or an airtight container in the fridge and discard when the powder begins to lose its freshness.

Make sure to also check out my Dark Chocolate and Black Sesame Biscuits!


300ml double cream

225g condensed milk

50ml evaporated milk

4 tsp golden syrup (or liquid glucose)

50g black sesame powder

3 tsp black sesame seeds, plus extra to sprinkle


Pour all of the ingredients except for the black sesame seeds into a large bowl and whisk until it has increased in volume and become thick but does not hold soft peaks. Scrape down the bowl using a spatula and fold through the black sesame seeds.

Transfer to a plastic container, scraping down the bowl completely – don’t waste any of that black sesame goodness!! Sprinkle more black sesame seeds over the top and then put the lid on the container.

Place the container into a bag – I recommend using one that you can get at the fruit/veg section in the supermarket – and then freeze for around 6 hours or until the ice cream has set and is firm.

Serve the ice cream either in a waffle cone or in a bowl. Finish the ice cream by sprinkling over some toasted black sesame seeds.

 

Dark Chocolate and Black Sesame Biscuits

Black sesame is an ingredient commonly used in many Chinese desserts such as black sesame soup called ji ma wu (a type of tong sui, or sweet soup – I’ve got a recipe for one here!) or as a filling for mochi or tong yuen which are glutinous rice balls.

In the UK however, black sesame is much less commonly used in comparison to its white sesame counterpart and yet they are arguably more interesting an ingredient!

For a long time, black sesame was reserved only for decorating breads or to sprinkle over savoury dishes to make them more attractive and trendy-looking but as the Western world begins to become more greatly influenced by Asian cultures, black sesame has found itself becoming an ingredient found much more frequently in recipes where the black sesame is a main ingredient and not just a garnish.

You might find maverick chefs, patissiers and chocolatiers using black sesame in their tuiles, biscuits, chocolates and cakes – and that includes Iain from Bake Off who made black sesame ice cream (and threw it in the bin)! Its colour as well as its flavour is certainly what has made black sesame such an attractive ingredient; the distinctive grey colour it produces is rather wonderful and tastes completely different to how it looks! You can find my No Churn Black Sesame Ice Cream recipe by clicking on the name!

Black sesame has a bitter, nuttier and smokier flavour compared to white sesame which are basically the same except black sesame does not have its outer hulls removed. This minute difference in the flavour means that black sesame is much more exciting an ingredient and what makes it so tasty too.

You’ll often black sesame being paired together with matcha green tea or dark chocolate as in today’s recipe for Black Sesame and Dark Chocolate Biscuits.

This follows a basic sugar cookie recipe which I finally have perfected after trying numerous recipes. If you wanted to make a basic plain cookie, simply omit the black sesame and the dark chocolate and up the sugar by 10g. You can also find my Funfetti Sugar Cookies too by clicking here. You might also want to check out my Dark Chocolate Chunk Cookies, White Chocolate and Cranberry Cookies and my Coffee and Vanilla Striped Biscuits! 


85g margarine

90g granulated sugar

1 egg

190g plain flour

10g black sesame seeds, plus extra to decorate

20g dark chocolate, finely grated


In a large bowl, cream together the margarine with the sugar until it is lighter in colour and the sugar has dissolved and is smooth. Add in the egg and beat well. Add in the plain flour, the black sesame seeds and the grated dark chocolate and fold through until it forms a pliable but not sticky dough.

Shape the dough into a ball, wrap in clingfilm and chill for 2 hours or overnight.

When you are ready to bake, preheat the oven to 180˚C. Line 2 baking trays with parchment.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the biscuit dough to 0.5cm thick, lifting up from the surface every so often so it doesn’t stick. Using a lightly floured 4cm cutter, cut out rounds of the biscuit dough and place on the lined baking tray, rerolling the offcuts no more than twice; these biscuits do not spread but will bake more evenly with space left between them for air to circulate.

Place 1 black sesame seed in the centre of each biscuit, pressing down lightly so it is embedded.

Bake the biscuits in the oven for around 11 minutes or until the edges have turned golden. Leave the biscuits on the baking tray to cool for 15 minutes before moving to a cooling rack to cool fully.

Product Review: Smart Bacon Express

I love bacon. The salty fatty pork is utterly delicious and addictive and I think plays a huge role in the British psyche. The Americans may chuck bacon onto literally everything but we have the upper hand with the bacon butty and the English breakfast. The tasty yet humble bacon butty may be simple but also divisive; white, brown or a bap, ketchup, brown sauce or an egg, toasted or untoasted, butter or no butter, everyone has it their own way.

For me, the perfect bacon butty is toasted sliced white or wholemeal bloomer (I’m not fussed) spread with butter with crisp unsmoked bacon.

The bacon I would have is not the crispy bacon that the Americans have on their pancakes; it simply wouldn’t work. But at times, getting crispy bacon which is crispy but not burnt can be difficult – the so-called perfect bacon. I’ve seen various tips and tricks to get crispy bacon such as:

  • Take the bacon out 10 minutes before frying so it returns to its natural state and start with a cold cast iron pan and do not overcrowd the pan with bacon
  • Place the bacon a wire rack over a roasting tray to catch the fat and bake in the oven
  • Put cold bacon into a cast iron skillet lined with foil and add water to the skillet
  • Microwave the bacon on a plate, layering the bacon between multiple sheets of paper towels for about 5-6 minutes

While these methods all yield crispy bacon, the UK now has a new and innovative way of cooking bacon without having to turn on the hob or the oven. The Smart Bacon Express is a new healthier way to cook bacon to crispy perfection quickly and easily.

The Bacon Express instantly reminds me of a toaster, especially with the dial on the side that allows you to adjust the cooking time depending on the thickness of your bacon and how crispy you want it. The Bacon Express allows you to cook up to 6 rashers of bacon at a time – probably more than you can fit in your average sized frying pan or baking tray.

The Bacon Express has cool touch handles on the side panels which easily open to reveal the inside. The bacon is laid over the cooking plate inside which can be easily removed using the two tabs. This unique vertical cooking position allows the fat to drain away into the removable drip tray underneath the cooking plate giving crisper and healthier bacon. The two door plates again can be removed for easy cleaning. The chrome finish gives the Bacon Express a modern style, making it suitable for all kitchens.

You can watch my unboxing of the Smart Bacon Express on my Youtube channel below!

My initial impression of the Bacon Express was that it was very easy to use and set up. With just a simple touch of a button, the Bacon Express is preheated and ready to cook the bacon in no time! The intense sizzling sound when you lay your rashers of bacon on is amazing and unrivalled! Then simply shut the two doors, turn the dial to your required setting, press the button and then leave to cook. It’s that simple!

The thin crispy bacon setting took around 6 and a half minutes to cook the bacon that I tested in the video. This is certainly quicker than achieving crispy bacon through the cast iron skillet methods I mentioned above but of course there are limitations to this; cooking large amounts of bacon for a big group of people or a family means that the Bacon Express takes much longer than the other methods and while the bacon yielded from the Bacon Express is amazingly crispy (something I have never managed before), it wouldn’t be worth your time for a large amount when the grill/hob would do the same job much quicker! The size of bacon sold in the UK is larger in width than the ones on the packaging so you probably won’t be able to fit 6 strips on the cooking plate; 3 is probably the average number you can fit on.

Hence the Bacon Express is well suited for a university student like myself who is probably only cooking for themselves as well as other people living on their own, new couples or new homeowners. I know that I would certainly use the Bacon Express instead of microwaving my bacon (which is a nightmare at times!) or trying to grill it – the number of stories I have heard about smoke alarms being set off when people have tried to cook bacon! The Bacon Express is advantageous for cooking small amounts of crispy bacon where perhaps you won’t be cooking eggs in the same pan for the flavour or don’t want to turn on the gas/hob or oven – for example for a salad topping or a pasta salad.

Moreover the Bacon Express lends itself well to multitasking in the kitchen. Really the bacon does not require any of your attention thanks to the beeping after it has preheated and after the bacon has cooked meaning that except from opening it just to have a check on its progress, you can very easily prepare your bread for your bacon butty or scramble your eggs while the bacon sizzles away happily in the Bacon Express which is a huge positive.

When it comes to cleaning, the cooking plate, the two door plates and the drip tray are all very easy to remove but not as easy to clean. The cooking and door plates all get surprisingly messy and after letting them cool so you can remove them safely, I found they had to soak for a while before I could properly clean them and even then, I couldn’t clean them fully without scratching the plates at least – this may have been down to the fact that I cooked lots of bacon and the residue from the first batch burned as time went on.

And when it came to replacing the door plates, I did struggle with one of them getting in properly at times. But the Bacon Express prevents any bacon fat splattering around due to the closed design which is a big advantage of the product and something I really liked about it.

When the doors of the Bacon Express are closed, it is very compact and fits well into most kitchens both size wise and aesthetically. But when the Bacon Express does require a bit of space when the doors are open and many kitchens just may not have the space to fit in this gadget.


The Bacon Express retails for £49.99 which, for me, seems to be on the expensive side considering I am approaching this from a student’s perspective who would benefit greatly from this product; I would have expected a cost of around £35 – £40. But even if you aren’t a student, the Bacon Express is certainly a fun kitchen gadget with an appeal to not only student kitchens but for people living on their own, new couples, new homeowners and kitchen technology lovers too! For the bacon lovers, the Bacon Express will deliver the crispy bacon that they so desperately crave without the hassle of buying a cast iron skillet.

Overall I really enjoyed my time with the Bacon Express. The bacon it yielded was the crispiest I think I have ever had it, especially for the time that it took. The speed at which it cooked impressed me and made me think that the Bacon Express could have a place in my student kitchen when I need a cooked breakfast in a hurry – and I could also make a cup of tea or make some toast while it cooks, saving time. I would probably have a few issues with cleaning the door plates since I probably wouldn’t be able to clean it until after I got back from a day of lectures and it would require soaking for a while. It also would take up little room in the kitchen while it’s not being used which is a huge advantage.

The Bacon Express is certainly coming with me back to uni for my second year!

At the time of writing, the Bacon Express is currently available exclusively at Harts of Stur; I’ve put their social media links at the end of this post as well as a direct link to the product and their website so you can plenty more cookware items to purchase – and they have a clearance on too so make sure to check that out; you get free delivery on orders over £50 too!


As with all of my reviews, I keep the product after reviewing it but do not receive direct payment from this review. I have not been told to falsely write positive comments about the product and everything is my opinion. Also thanks to Ben for letting me borrow his kitchen – I’m sure he didn’t mind having bacon cooked for him!

Check out Harts of Stur’s website as well as their Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google Plus and Pinterest!

A direct link to the Bacon Express on the Harts of Stur website can be found by clicking here.

Comment down below about what you think of the Bacon Express! I would love to hear your thoughts!

Follow me on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and make sure to check out my previous recipe post for Sausage Stuffing Bonbons!

Sausage Stuffing Bonbons

They say that you’re obsessed with food when you start coming up with recipes and ideas at night before you go to sleep and this was certainly one of those occasions. In a moment of pure madness (and yet slight genius), I came up with my Sausage Stuffing Bonbons.

Now please bear with me, I struggled to come up with a name for these because “Sausage Balls” is too much of an innuendo for me to handle and especially if I add the word “crunchy” to it (as I did in my first draft)! I ended up calling them Sausage Stuffing Bonbons because they are little balls of sausage meat coated in a breadcrumb stuffing mix and bonbons makes them sound more playful and fun.

The idea first came to me when I wanted to try making my own Scotch eggs which soon turned into making mini Scotch eggs and then becoming Scotch eggs without an egg. Okay they are essentially a meatball however the difference between a standard meatball and my Sausage Stuffing Bonbons is that they are coated in a crunchy breadcrumb coating like a Scotch egg. Then I had a brainwave to use a sage and onion stuffing mix (which is essentially flavoured breadcrumbs) as the coating which compliments the sausage meat amazingly.

This recipe makes a pack of sausages that you get in a supermarket just a bit different with not much effort at all. These would be ideal for a party because they are so simple, cheap, fuss-free and can be made a day ahead (and baked on the day) but they also make a great little snack (if you can stop at having just a few because that stuffing coating makes these totally addictive). If you want to add a bit of extra fun, pop them on a lollipop stick and you have a savoury lollipop!


1lb (454g) Cumberland sausages

2 tbsp plain flour

40g plain flour

1 egg

3 slices of white bread

60g sage and onion stuffing mix

Dips, condiments and sauces, to serve


Preheat the oven to 200˚C. Line a baking tray with a sheet of baking parchment.

Squeeze out the sausage meat from the skins into a mixing bowl, adding the 2 tablespoons of plain flour and season well with salt and pepper. Use your hands to combine until it is well mixed. Form 24 balls of the sausage meat and set aside.

Place the plain flour into a small bowl and season with salt and pepper. Beat together the eggs in another small bowl. In a food processor, blitz the bread into breadcrumbs and transfer to a large bowl. Then put the stuffing mix into the processor and blitz briefly until it is a fine crumb and then mix with the breadcrumbs.

Roll each ball lightly in the seasoned flour, coat in the beaten egg and then toss through the stuffing breadcrumb mixture. Place the balls onto the baking tray, leaving space in between each one.

Bake the sausage balls for around 20 – 25 minutes until the meat is cooked through and the coating is crisp and golden brown, turning halfway through. Drain the balls on kitchen paper before serving.

Serve warm alongside a variety of dips and condiments such as tomato salsa (as pictured), chutneys or relishes.

Chinese Coconut Milk Pudding (椰汁糕)

One of my favourite sweet dim sum to have at yum cha is 椰汁糕 or Coconut Milk Pudding. It’s a very light little morsel of coconutty goodness and is also wonderfully refreshing but doesn’t require a lot of effort to make yourself at home either!

To get the correct balance of coconut flavour, I use an almost one to one ratio of coconut milk to whole milk; using too much coconut milk can make it very overpowering. Most tins of coconut milk are also sold in 400ml tins so you don’t have to worry about having any leftover. One tip is to use a chopstick or a fork to give the contents of the tin a mix before pouring into the saucepan as the coconut milk usually separates into water and the coconut cream and if the pudding mixture is not well mixed, it tends to separate out later on.

I prefer using gelatine powder as opposed to the sheets which all the chefs seems to use on TV. I find using the weight of a powder is much easier to control the set of the pudding and it’s also much cheaper too; I stocked up on gelatine powder when I went to Hong Kong however it can be easily found online.

150ml boiling water

20g gelatine powder

1 x 400ml tin of coconut milk

350ml whole milk

½ tsp vanilla extract

100g granulated sugar

Dissolve the gelatine powder in the boiling water, stirring until completely lump free. Set aside.

In a saucepan over a medium heat, stir together the coconut milk, whole milk, vanilla extract and sugar until the sugar has dissolved. Then add in the gelatin mixture and stir again to dissolve.

Strain the mixture into a deep rectangular or square plastic container and leave to cool for 30 minutes before covering and refrigerating for 4 hours or until it is set; it should have a firm wobble and come away from the edges cleanly when you pull the pudding away.

To serve the pudding, flip out the pudding onto a chopping board and use a knife to slice into even cubes.

Giant Victoria Sponge Donut Cake

Here’s a great way of reinventing the classic Victoria sponge into a showstopper of a cake, this is my Giant Victoria Sponge Donut Cake.

I bought my giant donut mould from Lakeland when it was on offer for £2.50. I don’t often bake with silicon moulds but I enjoyed making this donut cake; greasing the moulds made the cakes turn out really easily and I loved how the cakes looked after they were turned out with the golden brown rings on the base.

The donut mould comes with a lid that you can put on one half so that the cake is baked with a slight hollow so you can fill it like a donut; unlike my Victoria Sponge donut, the filling is instead concealed giving it a more authentic doughnut look but I prefer having the filling exposed, it looks much more inviting to me! And even if you can’t find this exact mould, any savarin-shaped mould will do. Make sure that the inside is well greased and you may want to flour it too to extra ensure it turns out.

This cake went down a huge storm with the teachers at school who requested a cake from me. Unfortunately I didn’t manage to get a picture of a slice but when you get an empty cake stand brought home, you know it must have been good!


225g margarine

225g granulated sugar

4 eggs

225g self raising flour

1 tbsp whole milk

75g raspberry jam, sieved

300ml double cream

50g granulated sugar

1 tsp vanilla extract

80g icing sugar

Red food colouring

Sprinkles, to decorate


Preheat the oven to 170˚C. Grease two 21cm silicon donut moulds well and set aside.

In a large bowl, cream together the margarine with the granulated sugar until it is light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one by one, scraping down the bowl with a spatula after each addition. Add in the self raising flour and fold through until incorporated. Then beat in the tablespoon of milk until mixed through.

Divide the cake batter evenly between the 2 donut moulds and use the back of a spoon to level the surface. Bake the donut cakes for around 25 – 30 minutes until the cake is golden brown, coming away from the edges and an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Leave the cakes to cool in the mould for 10 minutes before peeling away the mould and leaving to cool fully on a cooling rack.

In another bowl, whisk the double cream with the sugar and vanilla extract until it holds a thick but soft peak. Then transfer to a piping bag fitted with a star nozzle and refrigerate until you are ready to assemble.

Prepare the icing by mixing together the icing sugar with enough milk to form an icing that is thick enough to stay on the cake but not too thin that it runs off the cake straight away. Add a drop of red food colouring to make a baby pink colour.

Place one donut half on your serving stand and use a serrated knife to level off the top if necessary. Spread the sieved jam over this top half, making sure it doesn’t go over the edge. Carefully pipe over the whipped cream in a swirl pattern, filling in any gaps after. Sprinkle over a few pink pearl sprinkles and then place the other sponge on top the right way up.

Then spread the pink icing over the top of the sponge, covering the entire surface and allowing it to drip down the sides slightly. Before the icing sets, sprinkle over some rainbow sprinkles and leave the icing to set before slicing to serve.

Foolproof Funfetti Icebox Sugar Cookies

I’ve said before that I find making cookies where you roll out and cut out cookie shapes not enjoyable. The cookies would usually end up tough and rather bland however after a lot of experimenting and sugar cookie baking, I’ve managed to get a recipe which produces perfect sugar cookies. These are my Foolproof Funfetti Icebox Sugar Cookies!

The perfect cookie is crisp around the edges and soft and chewy in the centre but the addition of rainbow sprinkles add not only a massive pop of colour but a tiny amount of texture which adds a lot of interest to a standard sugar cookie recipe.

I eliminate the chance of overworking the dough when you roll it out by hand by following an icebox cookie method. If you’ve not heard of an icebox cookie, you might actually be familiar with the method and some cookies which use it; checkerboard cookies, pinwheel cookies and striped cookies all use the icebox method.

The cookie dough is shaped into a log and chilled to firm it up which allows it to be sliced into shapes which give consistency across a batch of cookies. Icebox cookies tend to be smaller than your average chocolate chip cookie so the yield per batch is much higher than most other recipes. I averaged around 60 cookies per batch.

Icebox cookies have a further benefit in that the cookie dough can be made ahead and frozen and after time defrosting in the fridge, it can be used as normal. Just make sure that it is wrapped tightly in clingfilm so it doesn’t suffer from freezer burn.

Check out my other cookie recipes by clicking on the names:


170g margarine

200g granulated sugar

2 eggs

1 tsp vanilla extract

355g plain flour

1 tsp baking powder

80g rainbow vermicelli sprinkles, plus 50g for the outside of the cookies


In a large bowl, cream together the margarine with the sugar until it is lighter in colour and the sugar has dissolved and is smooth. Add in the eggs one at a time, beating well between each addition. Mix through the vanilla extract.

Sift in the plain flour and baking powder and using a rubber spatula, fold through the dry ingredients. Before the mixture comes together into dough, add in the rainbow sprinkles and continue to mix until a pliable dough forms.

Fill a baking tin with the extra rainbow sprinkles. Divide the dough into 4 and on a lightly floured surface, shape the dough into a log. Roll the log gently in the tin of sprinkles until the outside of the log is well covered. Lay out sheets of clingfilm and roll up the logs in clingfilm well. Shape the cookie dough into a cuboid shape and repeat for the rest of the dough. Chill for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 180˚C. Line a baking tray with baking parchment.

Using a sharp knife and a single downward motion, slice off pieces of the cookie dough ¼ of an inch thick and arrange on the baking tray, leaving room for spreading.

Bake the cookies for 9 – 11 minutes, or until the cookies have spread and are ever so slightly tinged golden around the edges. Leave the cookies to cool on the tray for 15 minutes before carefully lifting off the tray and transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.